We sat down with several members of Teva’s Veteran’s Employee Resource Group (ERG) to learn more about their career highlights.  These are their stories.

 

Danny McBryan M.D, SVP, Head of Medical Affairs & Pharmacovigilance shared why being Executive Sponsor of the Veteran’s ERG is important to him:

“I have always valued the enormous contribution that the Military makes to all our lives in keeping us safe and defending our way of life. Our ERG will strive to provide a supportive and nurturing network for Teva veterans while seeking to leverage skills and experiences that are unique to the Veteran community to the benefit of the company.”

 Danny McBryan Vet Story

 

DARRELL BARANOWSKI- Co-Business Lead of Teva’s Veteran ERG

Name: Darrell Baranowski, Associate Director, Global Generics R&D Project Leadership and Portfolio Management, Salt Lake City, UT

Service rank, rate/MOS/specialty: United States Marine Corps, 1992-2005; Gunnery Sergeant (E-7), 6492 – Aviation Precision Measurement Laboratory Specialist and 8411 – Recruiter

Academic Background: BS, Technical Management, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and MBA, Weber State University

Darrell Baranowski Vet Story

 What skills did you learn in the military that have helped you at Teva?

The Marine Corp taught me 14 leadership traits and 11 leadership principles that I try to uphold in my professional and personal life.

What is the biggest lesson you took from the military and use in your current role?

Develop and empower people. Authority to act should be delegated, but responsibility remains with the leader. Most importantly, consider everyone’s opinion regardless of position or rank.

Most memorable experience in the military:

On the morning of 9/11, I hurried to the base and huddled with our Sergeants on what we needed to do to help prepare equipment and facilities for deployment readiness as the unit hadn’t been deployed since Desert Storm. I felt great pride that my Marines didn’t skip a beat, despite the somber mood and circumstances.

What were the biggest challenges for you transitioning from a military to civilian career?

Like many veterans, I entered the corporate workforce with a certain level of entitlement because I was entrusted with a great level of responsibility at a young age. It was challenging to compete with civilian peers who spent time in parallel to my service learning specifics to the function and industry that I was just entering.

I also struggled with operational tempo differences because in the corporate world there are more ambiguities and more flexibility with deadlines.

What was the most surprising difference between military and civilian careers?

Specialization. While every Marine receives specific technical training to perform his/her job on a daily basis, there are numerous extra duties in the Marine Corps aviation world called “collateral duties.” If there is a breakdown or resource shortage, someone immediately fills in – either by volunteering or being “voluntold.”  In the military, there is no such thing as, “we have to wait for him/her to get back from…”

What advice would you give to transitioning service members joining Teva or any company?

You’ve built a strong resume, but your resume has to support the job you want, not the job you’re used to. When you went to Boot Camp, no one cared that you were a varsity athlete in high school, it only mattered how you applied your training in your new environment.

Use the intangible traits ingrained from your service to stand out. Ask questions to learn, not interrogate. Speak the truth, tactfully.

Most rewarding experience at Teva?

Getting safe and effective products on the market is why we’re here and I dance a little dance – or at least give a little shimmy – every time we launch a new product.

Why is serving on Teva Veteran’s ERG important to you?

While it is popular to “Support our Troops,” there is still little understanding by corporations and veterans of how the “other world” works or how that support translates to meaningful career opportunities.

I experienced some challenges in my transition from the military that, in hindsight, could have been managed more easily had I received guidance and if I had entered the workforce with a more open mind.

My passion isto develop people. The veteran community is a strong talent pool and I want to identify and help shape vets before they get a chance to be discouraged by any perceived differences between military and corporate life.

 

PATRICIA LARKIN- HR Lead of Teva’s Veteran ERG

Name: Patricia Larkin, Associate Director, Human Resources, TGO Global Functions, Parsippany, NJ

Service rank, rate/MOS/specialty: US Coast Guard- 2003 to 2010; O-3/Lieutenant—Personnel

Academic Background: Bachelors of Science in Management- US Coast Guard Academy and Masters in Human Resource Management- Rutgers University

Patricia Larkin Vet Story

What skills did you learn in the military that have helped you at Teva?

Teamwork, risk assessment, and quick decision-making. 

What is the biggest lesson you took from the military and use in your current role?

Trust but verify. 

Most rewarding experience while serving in the military:

Any time we stopped illegal drugs from entering the United States or saved people at sea.

What were the biggest challenges transitioning from the military to a civilian career?

Having marketable competencies, but lacking the specific skills and experience in civilian human resources to make a lateral move directly from military HR.

What was the most surprising difference between your military and civilian careers?

Career growth looks more like a spider web than a ladder. Special projects, temporary assignments, and taking lateral positions can often contribute to future promotions better than time spent in a role. 

What advice would you give to transitioning service members joining Teva or any company?

Your new colleagues bring years of experience and insight into the company. Make connections early and identify mentors to help you navigate your new work environment and career.

Most rewarding experience at Teva?

I’m proud that my everyday work supports the production of generic medicines that can help people around the world. 

Perspective On the role of Teva’s Veteran’s Employee Resource Group (ERG):

As the HR Lead of the Veterans ERG, I support, encourage, and enable the members to achieve their objectives by bringing together veterans and allies for personal and professional development and networking opportunities. I am excited to see all of the great things we can accomplish together and look forward to supporting veteran and military families in the broader community.

 

LINDA COOPER

Name: Linda Cooper, Quality Analyst, Forest, VA

Service/rank, rate/MOS/specialty: United States Army 1990-1996 and E-4, 54 Bravo Nuclear, Biological, Chemical Warfare Specialist

Academic Background: Bachelors of Business-Averett University and Six Sigma Green Belt from Villanova University

Linda Cooper Vet Story

What skills did you learn in the military that have helped you at Teva?

Never be afraid to take on a challenge, but see it through to the end.

What personal motto did you take from the military to use in your current role? 

Never be afraid to tell the truth, no matter how painful, but be respectful.

What were the biggest challenges for you transitioning from a military to civilian career? 

In the military you put your faith in others to do their jobs effectively as your life may depend upon it. In a civilian career you have to prove yourself. 

Most rewarding experience at Teva? 

Knowing that the products we make can have a tremendous impact on patient’s lives.

 

JAMES HASSALL

Name: James Hassall, Employee Health & Safety (EHS) Site Group Lead, Cincinnati, OH

Service/ rank, rate/MOS/specialty: US Army, 10/6/1987 to 10/1/2010 and 1SG, 11Z5J3, Infantry, BFV Master Gunner

Academic Background: BA, Organizational Leadership, Ashford University and MBA, Ashford University

James Hassall Vet Story

What skills did you learn in the military that have helped you at Teva?

Team building, leadership, planning and persuading many different groups to accomplish a larger, common goal.

What personal motto and lessons did you take from the military to use in your current role?

Motto: Deeds, not words.

Lesson: Do not lose sight of the big picture when you are hit with setbacks. Consider the objective and how we can accomplish it now.

 My most memorable experience serving in the military:

I survived a helicopter crash in a CH-47 Chinook, along with a dozen other lucky souls, while stationed in Alaska. After eating only MRE’s for a month, all I could think of as the aircraft was spiraling towards the ground were the boxes of Honey Nut Cheerios that were flying out the door. I remember thinking “NO! Not the cereal!”  The aircraft was a complete wreck as we hit the hillside, but miraculously we all walked away with no injuries. The pilots did a masterful job saving our lives.

What were the biggest challenges for you transitioning from a military to civilian career?

Overcoming misconceptions that civilians have about military personnel. Military life is not like the basic training scene from the movie Full Metal Jacket.

What advice would you give to transitioning service members joining Teva or any company?

You are starting over, but use the leadership and management skills you have developed.  Be a lifelong learner.

Most rewarding experience at Teva?

Building a high-functioning team when I was a night shift operations supervisor.

 

 

CARLOS RUIZ

 Name: Carlos Ruiz, Employee Health & Safety (EHS) Director, Fajardo, Puerto Rico

Service/rank, rate/MOS/specialty: US ARMY (still in service in the US ARNG)

Previous service - 11B Infantry (highest enlisted rank - Staff Sergeant - E6)

Current service - 12A Engineering Officer (Captain- 03)

Academic Experience: MBA Human Resources Management, Ana G. Mendez University System, Puerto Rico

Carlos Ruiz Vet Story

What skills did you learn in the military that have helped you at Teva?

Leadership, Effective Communication, Self-Sufficiency, Discipline, Financial Responsibility, Accountability, Integrity, Teamwork, Adaptability and Commitment

What is the biggest lesson or personal motto you took from the military and use in your current role?

When everything else fails, “let me try” (a US Army Corp of Engineers motto commonly known as, ESSAYONS)

Most memorable moment from my service in the military:

Helping my own community after Hurricane Maria was a very emotional and intense experience.

I helped clear important supply routes, built bridges to connect communities, and supervised a portion of the work done at the Guajataca Dam (a water storage structure).I also served as direct liaison between the US Corp of Engineers and municipalities under my area of command (East-South East of Puerto Rico).

What were the biggest challenges for you transitioning from a military to civilian career?

For a member of a reserve, adapting to civilian life is easier than for those on regular active duty. Having a place to work on my return makes the transition quicker and smoother, but it can still be tough after long deployments to hostile zones.

What was the most surprising difference between military and civilian careers?

The military has set standards and traditions. Civilian life has more space for creativity, adaptability and generational schools of thoughts.

What advice would you give to transitioning service members joining Teva or any company?

Attend a resiliency course provided free of charge by the military to help facilitate a transition to civilian life. Get in touch with another veteran from the organization who can provide guidance, support and an outlet for addressing concerns.

Most rewarding experience at Teva?

Teva has given me great development opportunities and has supported me in my military career. I have enjoyed working with a great team of co-workers that offer similar comradery to that which I experienced in the military.

 

Visit our Career page to learn more about working at Teva: https://www.tevausa.com/youcareer/